The Whisky Process is What Gives Each Country It’s Own Flavor

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The proper storage of grains is crucial in the distillery process. Without having the grain storage system in place, you could be compromising the quality of the grains used to produce your product. Take a look at the three major whisky distilling countries and see how each process distinguishes itself from the others.

Scottish Whisky
From the cliffs and moors of Scotland, you will find nearly 100 distilleries scattered throughout the country. This is the largest amount of distilleries in a single country in the world. The Scotts take their whiskey very seriously, and many of these distilleries have remained in the family for multiple centuries.

The main definitive factors that separate Scottish whiskey from others is that they are matured in oak barrels for a minimum of three years. In the creation of Scottish whiskeys, the use of only malted barley grain is used. This is a single malt and it all comes from only one place. There is just one grain storage system in Scotland that produces this single malt that all 100 distilleries must buy from. Though this is a costly process, it limits the variable in quality. Thus protecting the famous Scotch whisky reputation. That being said a scotch whisky sure can vary in flavor from spicy, smoky, fare and firm depending on which area of the country it is produced.

Irish Whisky
With far fewer distilleries than Scotland, Ireland only has four distilleries still in the works. With only three of them still selling whisky. The Irish whiskeys are known for having a lighter flavor than that of Scotland, because it is distilled three times verses only twice. There are other Irish whiskeys that really set themselves apart from any other in the world. They use a combination of malted and un-malted barley. With the use of these high quality grains, they are able to make unique flavors that have placed Irish Whisky as some of the best.

American Whisky
The straight whisky is what is sold in the United States. This type of whisky, or more commonly called bourbon, is actually a combination of corn, rye and barley. With a quality grain service these distilleries can receive the best of grains that the US has to offer. The recipe or grain formula, known as the ‘mash bill,’ states that a bourbon must contain a minimum of 51% corn. The truth is that there is a much higher percentage of corn in each batch of whisky that is actually produced. For the aged bourbons they must be stored in new charred oak barrels for at least two years. These are the kind of requirements that help maintain the consistency and quality of the American Whisky.

Since each of these American distilleries must have a large supply of three different kinds of grains (corn, barley and rye), they need to be sure to have the proper grain storage systems. Keeping the grains fresh prior to use is a huge priority of producing quality flavors for the final product.

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